A core of rhizosphere bacterial taxa associates with two of the world’s most isolated plant congeners

Johannes J. Le Roux, Pedro W. Crous, Casper N. Kamutando, David M. Richardson, Dominique Strasberg, Michael J. Wingfield, Mark G. Wright, Angel Valverde

Research output: Contribution to journal/periodicalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Understanding the contributions of abiotic and biotic conditions to soil microbial diversity, structure, and function, remains a central focus in soil biology and biogeochemistry. Here we aim to determine how geography and host plant identity influence these different components of rhizosphere bacterial communities and endosymbionts associated with Acacia heterophylla on Réunion island (Mascarene archipelago, Indian Ocean) and A. koa in the Hawaiian Islands (Hawaiian archipelago, Pacific Ocean). These two tree species are remarkable: they are each other’s closest living relatives despite their habitats being more than 16 000 km apart.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)277-294
Number of pages18
JournalPlant and Soil
Volume468
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Sep 2021

Keywords

  • Acacia
  • Bradyrhizobium
  • Core microbiome
  • Dispersal limitation
  • Host selectivity
  • Island biogeography
  • Rhizosphere soil

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