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Chemical espionage on species-specific butterfly anti-aphrodisiacs by hitchhiking Trichogramma wasps. / Huigens, M.E.; Woelke, J.B.; Pashalidou, F.; Bukovinszky, T.; Smid, H.M.; Fatouros, N.E.

In: Behavioral Ecology, Vol. 21, No. 3, 2010, p. 470-478.

Research output: Scientific - peer-reviewArticle

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Huigens, M.E.; Woelke, J.B.; Pashalidou, F.; Bukovinszky, T.; Smid, H.M.; Fatouros, N.E. / Chemical espionage on species-specific butterfly anti-aphrodisiacs by hitchhiking Trichogramma wasps.

In: Behavioral Ecology, Vol. 21, No. 3, 2010, p. 470-478.

Research output: Scientific - peer-reviewArticle

BibTeX

@article{c28c276705ec41a9a5a62e676d606a82,
title = "Chemical espionage on species-specific butterfly anti-aphrodisiacs by hitchhiking Trichogramma wasps",
abstract = "Parasitic wasps employ a wide range of chemical cues to find their hosts. Very recently, we discovered how 2 closely related egg parasitoids, Trichogramma brassicae and Trichogramma evanescens, exploit the anti-aphrodisiac pheromone benzyl cyanide of one of their hosts, the gregarious large cabbage white butterfly Pieris brassicae that deposits a clutch of more than 20 eggs per oviposition bout. The pheromone is transferred by male butterflies to females during mating to enforce female monogamy. On detecting the anti-aphrodisiac, the tiny parasitic wasps ride on a mated female butterfly to a host plant and then parasitize her freshly laid eggs. The present study demonstrates that both wasp species similarly exploit the anti-aphrodisiac mixture of methyl salicylate and indole of another host, the more common solitary small cabbage white butterfly Pieris rapae that deposits only one egg at a time. Interestingly, this behavior is innate in T. brassicae, whereas T. evanescens learns it after one successful ride on a mated female butterfly. Moreover, we show that the wasps only respond to the anti-aphrodisiacs of the 2 cabbage white butterflies when the ubiquitous compounds are part of a complete mated female odor blend. Obviously, parasitic wasps use the sophisticated espionage-and-ride strategy to find eggs of different gregarious and solitary host species. From the wasps’ perspective there seems to be a trade-off between the abundance and egg-laying behavior of the butterflies. Our findings suggest that Pieris butterflies are under strong selective pressure to minimize the use of an anti-aphrodisiac",
author = "M.E. Huigens and J.B. Woelke and F. Pashalidou and T. Bukovinszky and H.M. Smid and N.E. Fatouros",
note = "Reporting year: 2010 Metis note: 4764;CTE ; CL; TE ; AqE; file:///L:\EndnoteDatabases\NIOOPUB\pdfs\PDFS2010\Huigens_ea_4764.pdf",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1093/beheco/arq007",
volume = "21",
pages = "470--478",
journal = "Behavioral Ecology",
issn = "1045-2249",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Chemical espionage on species-specific butterfly anti-aphrodisiacs by hitchhiking Trichogramma wasps

AU - Huigens,M.E.

AU - Woelke,J.B.

AU - Pashalidou,F.

AU - Bukovinszky,T.

AU - Smid,H.M.

AU - Fatouros,N.E.

N1 - Reporting year: 2010 Metis note: 4764;CTE ; CL; TE ; AqE; file:///L:\EndnoteDatabases\NIOOPUB\pdfs\PDFS2010\Huigens_ea_4764.pdf

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Parasitic wasps employ a wide range of chemical cues to find their hosts. Very recently, we discovered how 2 closely related egg parasitoids, Trichogramma brassicae and Trichogramma evanescens, exploit the anti-aphrodisiac pheromone benzyl cyanide of one of their hosts, the gregarious large cabbage white butterfly Pieris brassicae that deposits a clutch of more than 20 eggs per oviposition bout. The pheromone is transferred by male butterflies to females during mating to enforce female monogamy. On detecting the anti-aphrodisiac, the tiny parasitic wasps ride on a mated female butterfly to a host plant and then parasitize her freshly laid eggs. The present study demonstrates that both wasp species similarly exploit the anti-aphrodisiac mixture of methyl salicylate and indole of another host, the more common solitary small cabbage white butterfly Pieris rapae that deposits only one egg at a time. Interestingly, this behavior is innate in T. brassicae, whereas T. evanescens learns it after one successful ride on a mated female butterfly. Moreover, we show that the wasps only respond to the anti-aphrodisiacs of the 2 cabbage white butterflies when the ubiquitous compounds are part of a complete mated female odor blend. Obviously, parasitic wasps use the sophisticated espionage-and-ride strategy to find eggs of different gregarious and solitary host species. From the wasps’ perspective there seems to be a trade-off between the abundance and egg-laying behavior of the butterflies. Our findings suggest that Pieris butterflies are under strong selective pressure to minimize the use of an anti-aphrodisiac

AB - Parasitic wasps employ a wide range of chemical cues to find their hosts. Very recently, we discovered how 2 closely related egg parasitoids, Trichogramma brassicae and Trichogramma evanescens, exploit the anti-aphrodisiac pheromone benzyl cyanide of one of their hosts, the gregarious large cabbage white butterfly Pieris brassicae that deposits a clutch of more than 20 eggs per oviposition bout. The pheromone is transferred by male butterflies to females during mating to enforce female monogamy. On detecting the anti-aphrodisiac, the tiny parasitic wasps ride on a mated female butterfly to a host plant and then parasitize her freshly laid eggs. The present study demonstrates that both wasp species similarly exploit the anti-aphrodisiac mixture of methyl salicylate and indole of another host, the more common solitary small cabbage white butterfly Pieris rapae that deposits only one egg at a time. Interestingly, this behavior is innate in T. brassicae, whereas T. evanescens learns it after one successful ride on a mated female butterfly. Moreover, we show that the wasps only respond to the anti-aphrodisiacs of the 2 cabbage white butterflies when the ubiquitous compounds are part of a complete mated female odor blend. Obviously, parasitic wasps use the sophisticated espionage-and-ride strategy to find eggs of different gregarious and solitary host species. From the wasps’ perspective there seems to be a trade-off between the abundance and egg-laying behavior of the butterflies. Our findings suggest that Pieris butterflies are under strong selective pressure to minimize the use of an anti-aphrodisiac

U2 - 10.1093/beheco/arq007

DO - 10.1093/beheco/arq007

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 470

EP - 478

JO - Behavioral Ecology

T2 - Behavioral Ecology

JF - Behavioral Ecology

SN - 1045-2249

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 386631