Contact and conflict between adult children and their parents in immigrant families: is integration problematic for family relationships?

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Abstract

Previous studies have shown that family ties are relatively strong in most non-western immigrant groups in Europe. This paper focuses on differences within the immigrant population and examines how cultural and social aspects of integration affect the relationships that adult children have with their parents. The study is based on survey data with a systematic oversample of persons aged 15–45 with Moroccan and Turkish origins in the Netherlands. The focus is on the amount of contact and conflict that children have with their parents. Findings show that persons of Moroccan and Turkish origins have more frequent contact, but also somewhat more conflict with their parents compared to people without any migration background. Ordinal logit models show that ties to parents are weaker when immigrant children are more liberal in their values and behaviours and when they have more frequent contact with natives. Educational attainment tends to increase conflict between parents and adult children. It is concluded that cultural and social integration may hurt family relationships, pointing to another but less often recognised obstacle for immigrant integration in the west.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1419-1438
JournalJournal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Volume45
Issue number9
Early online date14 Sep 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • family
  • intergenrational relationships
  • cultural assimilation
  • social integration

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