Early-life conditions and adult mortality decline in Dutch cohorts born 1812–1921

J. Schellekens, F.W.A. van Poppel

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Abstract

Mounting evidence suggests that early-life conditions have an enduring effect on an individual’s mortality risks as an adult. The contribution of improvements in early-life conditions to the overall decline in adult mortality, however, remains a debated issue. We provide an estimate of the contribution of improvements in early-life conditions to mortality decline after age 30 in Dutch cohorts born between 1812 and 1921. We used two proxies for early-life conditions: median height and early-childhood mortality. We estimate that improvements in early-life conditions contributed more than five years or about a third to the rise in women’s life expectancy at age 30. Improvements in early-life conditions contributed almost three years or more than a quarter to the rise in men’s life expectancy at age 30. Height appears to be the more important of the two proxies for early-life conditions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)327-343
JournalPopulation Studies: a journal of demography
Volume70
Issue number3
Early online date13 Sep 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • adult mortality
  • early-life conditions
  • height
  • infant mortality
  • early-childhood mortality
  • SSCI

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