Fenjiashu: Economic development in the Chinese countryside based on household division inventories, ca. 1750–1910

Meimei Wang, Bas van Leeuwen

Research output: Contribution to journal/periodicalArticleScientificpeer-review

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Abstract

Despite the existence of a rich literature on Chinese partial household division, there is still limited evidence of its effect on land and capital accumulation and well-being. In this study, contrary to the dominant view, we find that household property size peaked around 1800s–1830s, suggesting that equal-share system did not necessarily lead to land fragmentation. We find evidence that this rise in farm sizes is related to the opposing forces of increased well-being and increased inequality.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)252-272
JournalAustralian Economic History Review
Volume61
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Keywords

  • China
  • Qing dynasty
  • probates
  • fenjia
  • household
  • farmland
  • economic growth
  • consumption

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