Microbial storage and its implications for soil ecology

K.E. Mason-Jones (Corresponding author), Serina L. Robinson, G.F. Veen, S. Manzoni, W.H. van der Putten

Research output: Contribution to journal/periodicalArticleScientificpeer-review

8 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Organisms throughout the tree of life accumulate chemical resources, in particular forms or compartments, to secure their availability for future use. Here we review microbial storage and its ecological significance by assembling several rich but disconnected lines of research in microbiology, biogeochemistry, and the ecology of macroscopic organisms. Evidence is drawn from various systems, but we pay particular attention to soils, where microorganisms play crucial roles in global element cycles. An assembly of genus-level data demonstrates the likely prevalence of storage traits in soil. We provide a theoretical basis for microbial storage ecology by distinguishing a spectrum of storage strategies ranging from surplus storage (storage of abundant resources that are not immediately required) to reserve storage (storage of limited resources at the cost of other metabolic functions). This distinction highlights that microorganisms can invest in storage at times of surplus and under conditions of scarcity. We then align storage with trait-based microbial life-history strategies, leading to the hypothesis that ruderal species, which are adapted to disturbance, rely less on storage than microorganisms adapted to stress or high competition. We explore the implications of storage for soil biogeochemistry, microbial biomass, and element transformations and present a process-based model of intracellular carbon storage. Our model indicates that storage can mitigate against stoichiometric imbalances, thereby enhancing biomass growth and resource-use efficiency in the face of unbalanced resources. Given the central roles of microbes in biogeochemical cycles, we propose that microbial storage may be influential on macroscopic scales, from carbon cycling to ecosystem stability.
Original languageEnglish
JournalISME Journal
VolumeIn press
Early online date2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2021

Keywords

  • international

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Microbial storage and its implications for soil ecology'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this