Older workers: stereotypes and occupational self-efficacy

R. Chiesa, S. Toderi, P. Dordoni, K. Henkens, E.M. Fiabane, I. Setti

Research output: Contribution to journal/periodicalArticleScientificpeer-review

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Abstract

Purpose
The present study aims to explore the relationship between organizational age stereotypes and occupational self-efficacy. First, we intend to test the measurement invariance of Henkens (2005)’s age stereotypes scale across two age group, respectively under 50 years and 50 years and older. Then, the moderator role of age groups in the relationship between age stereotypes and occupational self-efficacy is investigated.
Design/methodology/approach
The survey involved a large sample of 4667 Italian bank sector’s employees.
Findings
The results shows the invariance of the three dimensional structure of organizational stereotypes toward older workers scale: productivity, reliability and adaptability. Furthermore, the moderation is confirmed: the relationship between organizational age stereotypes and occupational self-efficacy is significant only for older respondents.
Research limitations/implications
The study suggests the importance to emphasize the positive characteristics of older workers and to reduce the presence of negative age stereotypes in the workplace, especially in order to foster the occupational self-efficacy of older workers.
Practical implications
The study suggests the importance for the organization to reduce the presence of age stereotypes to foster the self-efficacy of older workers.
Originality/value
Our findings are especially relevant in view of the lack of evidence about the relationship between age stereotypes and occupational self-efficacy.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1152-1166
JournalJournal of Managerial Psychology
Volume31
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • SSCI
  • ageing
  • age groups
  • older workers
  • age stereotypes
  • occupational self-efficacy

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