Organoids as Model for Infectious Diseases: Culture of Human and Murine Stomach Organoids and Microinjection of Helicobacter Pylori

Sina Bartfeld, Hans Clevers

Research output: Contribution to journal/periodicalArticleScientificpeer-review

112 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recently infection biologists have employed stem cell derived cultures to answer the need for new and better models to study host-pathogen interactions. Three cellular sources have been used: Embryonic stem cells (ESC), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) or adult stem cells. Here, culture of mouse and human gastric organoids derived from adult stem cells is described and used for infection with the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. Human gastric glands are isolated from resection material, seeded in a basement matrix and embedded in medium containing growth factors epidermal growth factor (EGF), R-spondin, Noggin, Wnt, fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 10, gastrin and transforming growth factor (TGF) beta inhibitor. In these conditions, gastric glands grow into 3-dimensional organoids containing 4 lineages of the stomach. The organoids expand indefinitely and can be frozen and thawed similarly as cell lines. For infection studies, bacteria are microinjected into the lumen of the organoids. Infected organoids are processed for imaging. The described methods can be adapted to other organoids and infections with other bacteria, viruses or parasites. This allows the study of infection-induced changes in primary cells.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Visualized Experiments
Issue number105
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Dec 2015

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