Shared Physiological Traits of Exophiala Species in Cold-Blooded Vertebrates, as Opportunistic Black Yeasts

Mariana Machado Fidelis do Nascimento, G Sybren de Hoog, Renata Rodrigues Gomes, Jason Lee Furuie, Jane Mary Lafayette Gelinski, Mohammad Javad Najafzadeh, Walter Antonio Pereira Boeger, Vania Aparecida Vicente

    Research output: Contribution to journal/periodicalArticleScientificpeer-review

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Several species of the genus Exophiala are found as opportunistic pathogens on humans, while others cause infections in cold-blooded waterborne vertebrates. Opportunism of these fungi thus is likely to be multifactorial. Ecological traits [thermotolerance and pH tolerance, laccase activity, assimilation of mineral oil, and decolorization of Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR)] were studied in a set of 40 strains of mesophilic Exophiala species focused on the salmonis-clade mainly containing waterborne species. Thermophilic species and waterborne species outside the salmonis-clade were included for comparison. Strains were able to tolerate a wide range of pHs, although optimal growth was observed between pH 4.0 and 5.5. All strains tested were laccase positive. Strains were able to grow in the presence of the compounds (mineral oil and RBBR) with some differences in assimilation patterns between strains tested and also were capable of degrading the main chromophore of RBBR. The study revealed that distantly related mesophilic species behave similarly, and no particular trend in evolutionary adaptation was observed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)353-62
    Number of pages10
    JournalMycopathologia
    Volume181
    Issue number5-6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2016

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