Stress-induced phase separation of ERES components into Sec bodies precedes ER exit inhibition in mammalian cells

Wessel van Leeuwen, Dan T M Nguyen, Rianne Grond, Tineke Veenendaal, Catherine Rabouille, Ginny G Farías

Research output: Contribution to journal/periodicalArticleScientificpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Phase separation of components of ER exit sites (ERES) into membraneless compartments, the Sec bodies, occurs in Drosophila cells upon exposure to specific cellular stressors, namely, salt stress and amino acid starvation, and their formation is linked to the early secretory pathway inhibition. Here, we show Sec bodies also form in secretory mammalian cells upon the same stress. These reversible and membraneless structures are positive for ERES components, including both Sec16A and Sec16B isoforms and COPII subunits. We find that Sec16A, but not Sec16B, is a driver for Sec body formation, and that the coalescence of ERES components into Sec bodies occurs by fusion. Finally, we show that the stress-induced coalescence of ERES components into Sec bodies precedes ER exit inhibition, leading to their progressive depletion from ERES that become non-functional. Stress relief causes an immediate dissolution of Sec bodies and the concomitant restoration of ER exit. We propose that the dynamic conversion between ERES and Sec body assembly, driven by Sec16A, regulates protein exit from the ER during stress and upon stress relief in mammalian cells, thus providing a conserved pro-survival mechanism in response to stress.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Cell Science
Volume135
Issue number23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Dec 2022

Keywords

  • Animals
  • Endoplasmic Reticulum/metabolism
  • COP-Coated Vesicles/metabolism
  • Golgi Apparatus/metabolism
  • Vesicular Transport Proteins/genetics
  • Secretory Pathway
  • Protein Transport
  • Mammals/metabolism

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