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Temporal carry-over effects in sequential plant-soil feedbacks. / Wubs, Jasper (Corresponding author); Bezemer, T. Martijn.

In: Oikos, Vol. 127, No. 2, 2018, p. 220-229.

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@article{653ee8cdbf2d42eb88d870dfaf24eef4,
title = "Temporal carry-over effects in sequential plant-soil feedbacks",
abstract = "Plant–soil feedbacks (PSF) strongly influence plant performance. However, to what extent these PSF effects are persistent in the soil and how they are altered by species that subsequently condition the soil is unclear. Here we test how conspecific and heterospecific soil-conditioning effects interact across different soil-conditioning phases. We conducted a fully factorial glasshouse experiment where six plant species conditioned soils in two consecutive phases and measured the performance of Jacobaea vulgaris. The species that conditioned the soil during the second conditioning phase strongly determined the performance of J. vulgaris, but also the order and combination of species that conditioned the soil in the two phases accounted for a large part of the variance. For shoot biomass this interaction was the dominant variance component. We show that soil conditioning legacies carry-over and interact with the conditioning effects of succeeding plants. In the field, species replacements at the patch level often appear to be unpredictable and we suggest that sequential feedbacks may explain these apparently unpredictable transitions.",
keywords = "NIOO",
author = "Jasper Wubs and Bezemer, {T. Martijn}",
note = "6328, TE; Data archiving: data archived in Dryad",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1111/oik.04526",
language = "English",
volume = "127",
pages = "220--229",
journal = "Oikos",
issn = "0030-1299",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Temporal carry-over effects in sequential plant-soil feedbacks

AU - Wubs,Jasper

AU - Bezemer,T. Martijn

N1 - 6328, TE; Data archiving: data archived in Dryad

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Plant–soil feedbacks (PSF) strongly influence plant performance. However, to what extent these PSF effects are persistent in the soil and how they are altered by species that subsequently condition the soil is unclear. Here we test how conspecific and heterospecific soil-conditioning effects interact across different soil-conditioning phases. We conducted a fully factorial glasshouse experiment where six plant species conditioned soils in two consecutive phases and measured the performance of Jacobaea vulgaris. The species that conditioned the soil during the second conditioning phase strongly determined the performance of J. vulgaris, but also the order and combination of species that conditioned the soil in the two phases accounted for a large part of the variance. For shoot biomass this interaction was the dominant variance component. We show that soil conditioning legacies carry-over and interact with the conditioning effects of succeeding plants. In the field, species replacements at the patch level often appear to be unpredictable and we suggest that sequential feedbacks may explain these apparently unpredictable transitions.

AB - Plant–soil feedbacks (PSF) strongly influence plant performance. However, to what extent these PSF effects are persistent in the soil and how they are altered by species that subsequently condition the soil is unclear. Here we test how conspecific and heterospecific soil-conditioning effects interact across different soil-conditioning phases. We conducted a fully factorial glasshouse experiment where six plant species conditioned soils in two consecutive phases and measured the performance of Jacobaea vulgaris. The species that conditioned the soil during the second conditioning phase strongly determined the performance of J. vulgaris, but also the order and combination of species that conditioned the soil in the two phases accounted for a large part of the variance. For shoot biomass this interaction was the dominant variance component. We show that soil conditioning legacies carry-over and interact with the conditioning effects of succeeding plants. In the field, species replacements at the patch level often appear to be unpredictable and we suggest that sequential feedbacks may explain these apparently unpredictable transitions.

KW - NIOO

UR - https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.2s7s5

U2 - 10.1111/oik.04526

DO - 10.1111/oik.04526

M3 - Article

VL - 127

SP - 220

EP - 229

JO - Oikos

T2 - Oikos

JF - Oikos

SN - 0030-1299

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 4546151