The Invisible Jews in August Froehlich’s “Nazi Death Parade” (1944): An Early American Sequential Narrative Attempt to Visualize the Final Stages of the Holocaust

Research output: Chapter in book/volumeChapterScientificpeer-review

Abstract

In this article I focus on an early but as yet unknown comic strip rendition of the last phase of the Holocaust which was produced in 1944 under the title ‘Nazi Death Parade’ by August M. Froehlich in an American pamphlet expressing the indignation at the many atrocities committed in previous years by the Nazis in Europe, which at the time was still largely occupied. In a relatively short narrative, the creator tried to illustrate the industrial murder process in the extermination camps on the basis of eyewitness accounts. The comic was in accordance with the ambition of the editors of this publication to make the American public aware of the nature and extent of the criminal intentions and activities of the Nazis who, in their view, should not remain unpunished.
Central to this contribution is the question of what view was given of the Holocaust in this comic strip and in what context this visual representation was expressed. In addition, the question arises to what extent we can say something about the way in which this comic representation relates to later comics about this genocide.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBeyond MAUS
Subtitle of host publicationThe Legacy of Holocaust Comics
EditorsOle Frahm, Hans-Joachim Hahn, Markus Streb
Place of PublicationVienna
PublisherBöhlau Verlag
Pages133-165
Number of pages33
ISBN (Print)9783205210658
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2021

Publication series

NameSchriften des Centrums für Jüdische Studien
PublisherBöhlau Verlag
Volume34

Keywords

  • Holocaust
  • Comics
  • graphic novels
  • visual culture
  • Visualization

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