Semiochemicals play an important role in interactions between living organisms in aquatic environments. Although the presence of chemical cues is confirmed in more and more systems, the chemical structures remain predominantly elusive. To create more accurate prey–predator interaction models and to advance the research on chemical communication, it is essential to identify these compounds. A literature overview of cues involving Daphnia (either as producer or receiver) is given and the progress towards their isolation and structure elucidation is described. Most of the research so far has concentrated on the elucidation of kairomones produced by predators of Daphnia (especially Chaoborus and several species of fish). Although some progress has been made, these cues have not been isolated and identified yet. Additionally new results on the isolation and identification of the kairomone responsible for the colony formation in Scenedesmus using differential diagnosis and bioassay-directed fractionation of Daphnia exudates are presented. The importance of suitable and well performing bioassays herein cannot be underestimated. Some preliminary results with solid-phase extraction with C18 proved to be reproducible for extracting the active compound from Daphnia water, although it was not possible to get the biological activity into a single fraction. The cue was not extractable with an anion exchanger (SAX). Subjecting the extract to HPLC led to one active fraction [KEYWORDS: semiochemicals, Scenedesmus, Daphnia, Solid-Phase Extraction, chemical communication, bioassay]
Original languageEnglish
Journal publication date2003

ID: 239083